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Venting a little


#1

Ugh, today I got told I now have vertical hetertrophia on top of MAV and bilateral damage, I’m 29 not 80 my body should not be falling apart already


#2

A slight squint? I’ve had one all my life (mine is horizontal), was treated in the London Eye Hospital and improved loads, but never perfect … just means the central detailed part of the retina doesn’t perfectly overlap on both eyes … no biggie … that’s surely a stable difference for which the brain probably long compensated for many, many years ago?


#3

My vision therapist thinks the injury I had kicked it off, like uncompensated it, she says that’s one of the reasons my eyes hurt looking at distance because of the extra work they are doing to hold the images as one


#4

ears could have had a bearing (ocular reflex) … yeah possible I guess … something the brain can surely fix over time … don’t panic captain! :slight_smile: Nothing probably broken, just out of equilibrium - another element of decompensation.

Hang in there Chris, it will get better!


#5

I assume you mean “vertical heterophoria”? I believe it’s also called “binocular vision dysfunction.”

That is actually good news for you - it means you may have found the cause of your dizziness. This has been discussed in some other threads here recently. Here’s a website that explains a little bit about it:

https://www.nvcofny.com/what-is-bvd/vertical-heterophoria/

"Vertical heterophoria (VH) is a type of binocular vision disorder that occurs when the eyes are misaligned and can lead to a number of symptoms you may not immediately connect with your eyes. This misalignment, which can be very small, leads to the straining and overuse of the eye muscles. This leads to the symptoms of BVD such as headaches and dizziness. Patients are often misdiagnosed as having vertigo and migraine disorder.

If you’ve been feeling off-balance both mentally and physically, the issue might not be the food you eat, the hours you work or your day-to-day habits; the root of your problem could extend to your eyes. Dr. Cheryl Berger Israeloff of the Neuro Visual Center of New York not only specializes in diagnosing VH and other binocular vision disorders, but in treating them as well."


#6

Found one of the causes, I have a bilateral weakness in both ears, so it seems the vertical het is one of probably three contributors with MAv and whatever is going on in my ears